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Housing and Camps FAQs

1.  Should I be concerned about mold in my home?

Yes, if the mold growth is extensive and/or can't be controlled by using disinfectants. Exposure to high airborne mold spore levels may lead to certain health problems. Additionally, mold can cause structural damage to various components in your home.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES DOES NOT TEST FOR MOLD. Additional general information on molds can be obtained from the following web sites:

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Biological Pollutants in Your Home

Common Indoor Air Pollutants

Indoor Air Quality: Basics for Schools

American Lung Association: Indoor Pollution: Biological Agents

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2.  What are the common symptoms of mold exposure?

Allergic reactions are the most common health effects associated with mold exposure. Symptoms may include respiratory problems, nasal and sinus congestion, burning eyes, watery eyes, reddened eyes, blurry vision, coughing, nose and throat irritation, skin irritation, shortness of breath, possible fever, and central nervous system symptoms such as memory problems, mood changes, and constant headaches.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SERVICES DOES NOT TEST FOR MOLD. Additional information on the symptoms of mold exposure can be obtained from the following web sites:

National Safety Council

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Asthma, Air Quality, and Environmental Justice

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3.  What is the phone number to someone that can help me with mold?

1-800-438-4318 (Cal EPA)

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4.  Can Environmental Health Services test for mold?

No, Environmental Health Services does not test or inspect for mold.

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